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SCIENTIST DISCUSSES HER THEORY OF EVOLUTION AT THE PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE SERIES TALK MARCH 4

Lynn Margulis, Distinguished Professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will discuss "The Composite Individual and the Evolution Machines" Thursday, March 4 at Old Dominion University.

Margulis' lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held at 8 p.m. in the Mills Godwin Jr. Life Sciences Building Auditorium. It is part of the 2003-04 President's Lecture Series at Old Dominion.

In her recent book, "Acquiring Genomes: A Theory of the Origin of Species," written with science writer Dorion Sagan, Margulis challenges the assumptions scientists have made about the mechanisms of evolution, providing evidence that new species arise by symbiotic merger of genomes rather than by random mutation. The Gaia Hypothesis, further developed with scientist James Lovelock, asserts that life does not passively adapt. Margulis says, "Rather it actively though unknowingly, modifies its own environment to increase chances of its perpetuation."

Margulis earned a Ph.D. in genetics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1965. She has been a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst since 1988. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences of the United States in 1983 and is a fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science and other distinguished scientific societies. In 1999, Margulis received a National Medal of Science from Bill Clinton.

For more information about the lecture call 683-3114.

This article was posted on: February 16, 2004

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