[ skip to content ]

Faculty Workshops

List of IDW Faculty Workshop Participants

Implementation of ODU’s QEP will give the faculty the opportunity to learn more about teaching and assessing student writing in the upper-division undergraduate courses they teach. A supportive, creative, and ongoing community environment will allow faculty to engage meaningfully in new pedagogies. This environment will also encourage them to embrace the idea that they are teaching the discipline even more effectively when they teach disciplinary writing.

The QEP Faculty Workshops have been developed and will be facilitated by outstanding ODU faculty members with expertise in the writing and pedagogy. In the workshops, faculty will have opportunities to explore important questions and concerns, such as:

  • How can I find room for writing in my course without sacrificing content?
  • What kinds of assignments produce the best learning in my discipline?
  • What types of writing prepare majors for employment in this field?
  • How can I use writing in large classes, distance education or online classes?
  • How can I respond to writing without spending my weekends grading papers?
  • What do I do about grammar, spelling, and punctuation?
  • I don’t want to be the only faculty member requiring more writing.

Faculty Workshops will be offered two or three times each year and may be recorded for future use. Summer participants will meet daily for one week while those in fall and spring semester workshops will meet on scheduled days over a period of weeks. Each workshop day will include discussion of a variety of topics along with specific strategies for writing to learn in the disciplines, followed by assignments for the next session’s activities. Active learning, including actually doing the kinds of writing being taught, comprises a key component of the workshops. In this way, faculty are expected to learn how to use writing as a means of discovery in their classrooms and in terms of formal writing assignments, as well as why and how writing works to promote student learning. The writing skills taught in the Faculty Workshops will be applicable to all modes of instructional delivery including distance learning as well as traditional face-to-face courses.

Faculty participating in the workshops will receive a $2,000 stipend upon completion of all associated requirements as outlined below. Compensation for participation in the workshops demonstrates the value that the University places on this endeavor. Learning new practices is costly in terms of both time and effort. The QEP’s compensation program recognizes the value of investing in development of new teaching practices.

Faculty participating in the workshops will be expected to:

  • Participate in all workshop sessions in the series
  • Complete all workshop assignments
  • Submit student writing samples from the semester prior to their workshop for use in assessment
  • Require that students, as part of course requirements, upload artifacts to Blackboard for use in assessment
  • Participate in at least three of five gatherings of workshop participants over the following year to discuss their experiences using best practices in their courses
  • Complete all assessments

Faculty who particularly embrace the best practices for teaching and assessing writing may be invited as guest speakers or workshop facilitators in subsequent semesters, and will be compensated for their participation.

Faculty Workshop Objectives

Participants in the workshops will:

  • • Explore connections between writing and learning in upper-division undergraduate courses in their disciplines
  • Design assignments that meet course objectives and help students produce documents that meet the student learning outcomes. The QEP student learning outcomes are that students will be able to produce documents that:
  • Clearly state a focused problem, question, or topic appropriate for the purpose of the task
  • Identify relevant knowledge and credible sources
  • Synthesize information and multiple viewpoints related to the problem, question, or topic
  • Apply appropriate research methods or theoretical framework to the problem, question, or topic
  • Formulate conclusions that are logically tied to inquiry findings and consider applications, limitations, and implications, and
  • Reflect on or evaluate what was learned.
  • Implement best practices and creative pedagogies that promote upper- division undergraduate disciplinary writing
  • Develop strategies for responding to written work which are helpful to students and not overly burdensome for faculty, and
  • Strengthen their teaching and learning conversations and collaborations.

Workshop Requirements

Participants will:

  • Participate in all workshop sessions
  • Complete all workshop assignments
  • Assignments based on write-to-learn principles
  • Directions for a formal assignment (with full context and evaluative criteria)
  • A syllabus (for a course to be taught in the upcoming academic year) that incorporates material from the workshop
  • A proposal for how they will share what they have learned in the workshop
  • Submit student writing samples from the semester prior to their workshop for use in assessment
  • Require that students upload artifacts to the learning management system (LMS) for use in assessment
  • Participate in at least three of five gatherings of workshop participants over the following year to discuss their experiences using best practices in their courses
  • Complete assessments as follows:
  • Pre-treatment at beginning of first workshop: Consortium for the Study of Writing in College (CSWC) questions for faculty
  • Post-treatment annually: CSWC questions for faculty
  • Pre-treatment at beginning of first workshop: Syllabi with writing assignment instructions
  • Post-treatment annually: Syllabi with writing assignment instructions